AINA & CLOUD MAKERS

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SCREENS ON THE 25TH OF MARCH AT 6 PM AT THE CIVIC THEATRE

AINA | THAT WHICH FEEDS US

Directed by Josh Thorne
Hawaii
2015

AINA (pronounced “eye-nah”) means, “that which feeds us” in the Hawaiian language. The film highlights a simple yet effective path for addressing some of the most pressing environmental and health crises facing the island of Kauai – and the entire world. That may sound like an outstanding claim, but as AINA vividly illustrates, such is the power of agriculture and consumer choices for people and the planet. “When we look at agriculture globally, it is the largest interface between humans and the environment. Agriculture is either going to make us or break us.”–Don Heacock, Biologist, from AINA.

AINA ALSO SCREENS AS PART OF MĀORILAND SHORTS | WHENUA ON THURSDAY 24th OF MARCH at 10:45 AM AT THE CIVIC THEATRE

CLOUD MAKERS

Directed by Rachel Deutsch
Canada
2013

Cloud Makers is a short film about the human impact of industry and contamination on First Nations land. It is the story of two sisters caught in a system where they and the land with which they share a deep relationship are abused and ignored.

Aamjiwnaang First Nation, bordering Sarnia Ontario, has been named the most polluted place in North America by National Geographic. There are 63 petrochemical and other chemical industries operating within 25km of the reserve. These industries are hardly regulated and many operate according to outdated health and environmental regulations.

The sisters live in a highly toxic and contaminated environment. Under constant security and video surveillance, light pollution, noise, and smoke, there is no peace. This is modern day colonialism, environmental racism, and ecocide.

With honesty and clarity of vision, the protagonists are able to express their deep love for the land, for eachother, and their earnest desire for a hopeful future.

EARTH SPEAKS

Directed by Rebecca Centeno
USA
2015

Native Americans speak about the Earth as our Mother and the impacts of oil and gas drilling on tribal lands in the United States, particularly on The Blackfeet Nation in North Central Montana. Outside entities target territories where unemployment hovers at 70%, promising wealth and prosperity, and offering little in return. The exploitation of people, land, and resources is not new to the Native American. How do people, even within the tribe, see the Earth? Is it with a “spiritual eye” or more pragmatic? How are these views affecting the industry on tribal lands, and what alternative is there for a world dependent on fossil fuels?

 

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