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June 2018

He Oranga Pumau

June 21 @ 6:30 pm - 9:00 pm
Māoriland Hub, 68 Main Street
Ōtaki, Kāpiti Coast New Zealand
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$6

He Oranga Pumau (32 mins) is a heartfelt documentary with Tanya Filia (Nga Puhi, Ngai Tahu) and Hirini Wikaira (Nga Puhi).   This self-funded documentary is Tanya's story of being told that she had two months to live in 2015, and how she turned to rongoa Maori and still lives well today.   He Oranga Pumau has been created as a campaign tool to make changes at policy level, and in our communities.   The broad aim is to make…

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July 2018

Taiao Tuesday: Matariki

July 3 @ 6:00 pm - 8:30 pm
Māoriland Hub, 68 Main Street
Ōtaki, Kāpiti Coast New Zealand
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$6

A special Matariki Taiao Tuesday. More details to come. Book tickets online at www.iticket.co.nz or in person at the Māoriland Hub

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Through Our Lens Screening – Porirua

July 3 @ 6:30 pm - 7:30 pm
Pataka, 17 Parumoana Street
Porirua, 5022 New Zealand
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$6

Established in 2014, Māoriland Film Festival (MFF) is New Zealand's International Indigenous film festival celebrating Indigenous voice and storytelling in film. Every March Indigenous filmmakers from around the world travel to Ōtaki on the Kāpiti Coast for five days of screenings, workshops, art exhibitions and special events. Now, audiences around Aotearoa will have the opportunity to experience some of the unique films of the fifth annual Māoriland Film Festival. THROUGH OUR LENS Through Our Lens is a kaupapa to connect…

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Made in Aotearoa – Porirua

July 3 @ 8:00 pm - 9:30 pm
Pataka, 17 Parumoana Street
Porirua, 5022 New Zealand
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$6

Made in Aotearoa is a selection of awesome Māori and Pacific short films that have toured the world. Established in 2014, Māoriland Film Festival (MFF) is New Zealand's International Indigenous film festival celebrating Indigenous voice and storytelling in film. Every March Indigenous filmmakers from around the world travel to Ōtaki on the Kāpiti Coast for five days of screenings, workshops, art exhibitions and special events. MFF2018 celebrated five years of the festival, with 60 international filmmakers joining 40 New Zealand…

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Mankiller – Porirua

July 4 @ 6:30 pm - 8:30 pm
Pataka, 17 Parumoana Street
Porirua, 5022 New Zealand
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$6

This is the story of an American hero. One who stands tall amongst the likes of Robert Kennedy, Harriet Tubman and Martin Luther King, Jr. Someone who humbly defied the odds and overcame insurmountable obstacles to fight injustice and gave a voice to the voiceless. And yet few people know her name. This is the story of an American legend, Wilma Mankiller, who overcame rampant sexism and personal challenges to emerge as the Cherokee Nation's first female Principal Chief in…

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Through Our Lens Screening – Whanganui

July 5 @ 6:30 pm - 7:30 pm
Davis Theatre, Watt Street
Whanganui, New Zealand
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$6

Established in 2014, Māoriland Film Festival (MFF) is New Zealand's International Indigenous film festival celebrating Indigenous voice and storytelling in film. Every March Indigenous filmmakers from around the world travel to Ōtaki on the Kāpiti Coast for five days of screenings, workshops, art exhibitions and special events. Now, audiences around Aotearoa will have the opportunity to experience some of the unique films of the fifth annual Māoriland Film Festival. THROUGH OUR LENS Through Our Lens is a kaupapa to connect…

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Made in Aotearoa – Whanganui

July 5 @ 8:00 pm - 9:30 pm
Davis Theatre, Watt Street
Whanganui, New Zealand
+ Google Map
$6

Made in Aotearoa is a selection of awesome Māori and Pacific short films that have toured the world. Established in 2014, Māoriland Film Festival (MFF) is New Zealand's International Indigenous film festival celebrating Indigenous voice and storytelling in film. Every March Indigenous filmmakers from around the world travel to Ōtaki on the Kāpiti Coast for five days of screenings, workshops, art exhibitions and special events. MFF2018 celebrated five years of the festival, with 60 international filmmakers joining 40 New Zealand…

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Mankiller – Whanganui

July 6 @ 6:30 pm - 8:30 pm
Davis Theatre, Watt Street
Whanganui, New Zealand
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$6

This is the story of an American hero. One who stands tall amongst the likes of Robert Kennedy, Harriet Tubman and Martin Luther King, Jr. Someone who humbly defied the odds and overcame insurmountable obstacles to fight injustice and gave a voice to the voiceless. And yet few people know her name. This is the story of an American legend, Wilma Mankiller, who overcame rampant sexism and personal challenges to emerge as the Cherokee Nation's first female Principal Chief in…

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Matariki Ball

July 7 @ 7:30 pm - July 8 @ 12:00 am
Māoriland Hub, 68 Main Street
Ōtaki, Kāpiti Coast New Zealand
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$45

Celebrate Te Tau Hou Māori 2018 in Star Style!   Tickets are $45 and include delicious kai, bubbles and live music with rising star Sianne(Kai Tahu/Tuwharetoa) & band plus beats with DJ No L. Book tickets in person at the Māoriland Hub or online at www.iticket.co.nz

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Puanga Kai Rau

July 10 - July 15
Māoriland Hub, 68 Main Street
Ōtaki, Kāpiti Coast New Zealand
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Puanga Kai Rau - is a debut exhibition where Māori artists familiar and unfamiliar to each other, gather as a fusion to create a new energy force likened to the majestic rising of Puanga in the night skies. Puanga is one of the connecting stars with Matariki, linking in to her ascension. An evening for celebration, acknowledgement, reflection and affirmation not only for contributing artists but the wider community. Join in on the Matariki Māori New Year festivities at the…

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PUANGA KAI RAU – SPECIAL EVENTS

PUANGA KAI RAU

Art Exhibition Opening

Tuesday 10th July 5.30-10.30pm

A vivacious movement of Māori A.R.T confederated, collaboratives and local artists communing in a 7-day exhibition hosted at the Māoriland Hub in Ōtaki. Disciplines range from kiriata, kakaahu, whakarākai, tuhi, whakairo, raranga, pūoro, toi kupu, waiata. reo and toi matarau. Artists in attendance are testament to the powerful energy of Puanga, a constellation of ancestral art forms unveiled this Matariki.

Opening night leads into a treat of live performances by Jerome Kavanagh, Taryn Te Uira Beri & Paranihia Solomon, Maru & Te Moananui-ā-Kiwa Karatea-Goodard, Te Kawairirangi Herangi followed by:

RINGA REHE

Tuesday 10 July 6:30 pm

Kanohi ki te Kanohi artist floor talks with Tipi Wehipeihana, Pip Devonshire (Te Wānanga o Raukawa Toi Whakarākai School of Weaving), Pikihuia Haenga, Karangawai Marsh & Jerome Kavanagh

KAUPAPA KŌRERO

OHO AKE

Kaupapa Kōrero

Thursday 12 July 1-2.30pm

A conscience raising panel discussion for rangatahi

Kaupapa: Where does the buck stop with cultural appropriation of taonga Māori? What is cultural appropriation?

A panel comprised of descendants of Ngāti Toa, Te Ātiawa, Ngāti Raukawa ki te Tonga and a local high profiled artist testing and pushing boundaries in both mainstream and the Māori Arts arena. 

  • Convened by Libby Hakaraia, who will be posing the question for panelists to discuss what cultural appropriation is. They will present their understandings and perspectives from a Māori ad non-Māori world view to educate and raise awareness of the application of taonga Māori in a new millennium where attitudes and mindsets continue to evolve. The purpose is to draw attention to the moral obligations and responsibilities of ngā uri whakatupu – the next generation.

    Specifically designed to conscientise the youth of today, Māori and the general public. OHO AKE is about stirring awareness and stimulating inquiring and positive dialogue. Politicising consciousness of the uses of taonga Māori within a fast-paced global market. Digital native junkies, art students and creatives or not, the aim is to bring young people up to speed on what is culturally correct and incorrect. Where cultures collide and react, to behave or misbehave? The domain of expression, belief systems and values are examined under the microscope by a panel of very astute, articulated young individuals. Set to broaden and shape further the thinking of all walks of youth who are wondering what the heck cultural appropriation is and where it comes from. This is also an opportunity for caregivers, educators and members of the community to gain an understanding of some of the issues cultural appropriation impacts on across indigenous communities.

MOKO PUNA

Kaupapa Kōrero

Thursday July 12 6.30pm

Take Whero

A te reo Māori panel discussion by wāhine moko kauae from the confederation of A.R.T. followed by Q&A.

Kaupapa: Ka tāmokongia tonu te kauae o te wahine Pākehā i tēnei rautau? He aha ai?

Should non-Māori women wear kauae moko in the 21st century

  • MOKO PUNA – the title of this panel discussion gives notice of the direction this think tank is targeted at, referencing the sources of our DNA. An open mind will serve well to this one night only event in honour of Mataariki Ahunga Nui. In particular the opportunities that present, to replenish and rejuvenate ourselves over these cold winter months, where knowledge is the enabler. It is a time to look back and reflect in order to move forward, make plans, adjustments and improvements. Therefore, themes discussed will differ from one panelist to the next, whether it be political, religious or of a very strong Māori world view. 

    A compelling conversation by Māori women, bearers of facial moko.

    Iriaka Epiha-Ferris
    Ngāti Toa Rangatira, Ngāti Porou, Nga Puhi

    Mere Ropata-Box
    Ngāti Huia, Ngāti Toa Rangatira, Ngāti Kurī, Te Ātiawa, Nga Puhi

    Mari Ropata-Te Hei
    Ngāti Huia, Ngāti Toa Rangatira, Ngāti Kurī, Te Ātiawa, Nga Puhi

    Puhiwahine Tibble
    Ngāti Raukawa, Ngāti Tuwharetoa, Ngāti Porou, Te Whānau a Apanui

    Tungia Kaihau-Simmonds
    Waikato. Ngāti Maniapoto

    Speaking on:
    What it means to be blueprinted? 
    What it means to wear moko kauae from the inside? 
    What is kaitiakitanga? 

    While the panel is a public forum and family orientated, a mature audience is suggested. 

TE KĀHUI A MATAARIKI

Artists in Residence

From Wednesday 11th July 11am

Local artists, who use their hands to do the talking work onsite at Māoriland throughout the week. Look through the lens of an artist’s processes and aesthetics to find a deeper understanding of the decision-making methodologies, tikanga and kaupapa Māori with;

Taryn Te Uira Beri – Tāmoko
Lorna Tawhiti – Tattooing
Jerome Kavanagh – Taonga Pūoro
Johnny Hauraki – Tāmoko, Whakairo
Elaine Bevan – Raranga
Pip Devonshire – Raranga 
Te Aomarama Wilson – Raranga
Maakarita Paku – Tuhi, Toi Matarau

An informal gathering for the public and wider community to visit and meet with artists in their element. Traditionally a busy time of year in the Winter months of Mataariki when confined by the cold. This is when artists wānanga, reflect, research, plan and enter into collaborations for the future. 

All participants have exhibition pieces for viewing in the Puanga Kai Rau Gallery at Māoriland and are available for consultation of appointments, orders and commissions.

Wednesday 11th July

Taryn Te Uira Beri
Lorna Tawhiti
Johnny Hauraki
Jerome Kavanagh
Pip Devonshire

Thursday 12th July

Taryn Te Uira Beri
Lorna Tawhiti
Johnny Hauraki
Elaine Bevan
Jerome Kavanagh

Friday 13th July

Taryn Te Uira Beri
Lorna Tawhiti
Johnny Hauraki
Elaine Bevan
Jerome Kavanagh
Pip Devonshire

Saturday 14th July

Johnny Hauraki
Elaine Bevan
Maakarita Paku
Te Aomarama Wilson

Sunday 15th July

Johnny Hauraki
Maakarita Paku
Te Aomarama Wilson

Monday 16 – Tuesday 17th July

Johnny Hauraki