MĀORILAND FILM FESTIVAL

Each March the Indigenous world comes together in Ōtaki, Aotearoa (New Zealand) to celebrate Indigenous screen storytelling at Māoriland Film Festival, the largest Indigenous film festival in the Southern Hemisphere.

Located on New Zealand’s Kāpiti Coast, Ōtaki is a vibrant seaside town where Māori culture and language thrives. 

The 2020 Māoriland Film Festival will take place from Wednesday 18 – Sunday 22 March.

ARTISTIC POLICY

Māoriland exists to uplift the perspectives and stories of Indigenous peoples.

Māoriland invites film, video, digital and interactive media work and artwork (all mediums) made by Indigenous creatives.

To be eligible for Māoriland an Indigenous creative must be credited in a key role such as director, producer or screenwriter.

The Indigenous creative must self-identify with and be recognised as an Indigenous person. Indigenous peoples are also known as Tangata Whenua, Aboriginal, Native, First Peoples or Tribal Peoples who belong to; or who have had an uninterrupted relationship with their land. This is distinct from those people who have arrived from another place to live in a country.

While a key creative involved in the project must be Indigenous, the issue or content of the film may be non-Indigenous. This recognises the diverse experiences, identities and perspectives of Indigenous people(s), worldwide.

Where the eligibility of a submitter is unclear, Māoriland will follow up with the submitter to clarify eligibility.

Māoriland prioritises work that:

  • Innovates to present unique and new Indigenous perspectives
  • Provides a portal to the Indigenous world for ALL peoples.
  • Upholds the mana (respect for) and inspiration of our storytellers – guided by our elders and taught by our children.
  • Respects our audience
  • Relevance of work in regards to emerging themes and issues that shape our wider Indigenous experience.

Programmers may consider a limited number of works at its discretion where a work has been created with genuine and mutual participation from an Indigenous person or group of peoples. References and further background will be requested for works submitted under this category.

mff2020_nighty4-copy

TĀRIA TAKU MOKO MĀORI KI NGĀ KIRIATA O TE WĀ
EMBED MY NATIVE SOUL IN FILM

KEY DATES

 

Earlybird Submissions open (FREE):

August 1 2019

Earlybird Submissions close:

August 30 2019

Regular Submissions ($11.50 NZD) close :

October 7 2019

Late Submissions ($28.75 NZD) close:

October 27 2019

Notification Date:

By January 31 2020

Print Traffic Deadline:

February 18 2020

MFF 2020 
MARCH 18 – 22 

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

  1. All submissions must be made online using Zone Festival.
  2. All non-English language films must have subtitles  in English for final viewing, Indigenous languages may be un-subtitled if the overarching message of the film is clear.
  3. Preview screeners and exhibition masters must have no commercial blacks or broadcaster promos.
  4. The deadline for film festival submissions is October 7, 2019. Late submissions will be considered until October 27, 2019. If your work is not ready for the deadline and you wish it to be considered for this year’s Festival, please contact [email protected] immediately.
  5. Submission to the 2020 festival will incur the below fees.
    • Earlybird Submissions open (FREE): July 26 2019
    • Earlybird Submissions close: August 30 2019 2019
    • Regular Submissions ($11.50 NZD) close : October 7 2019
    • Late Submissions ($28.75 NZD) close: October 27 2019
    • Māoriland Film Festival is run by a not-for-profit charitable trust. The submission fees assist us with the hefty administration and time it takes to create our festival programme.

  1. Read the submission instructions carefully before submitting.
  2. Incomplete Submission Forms will not be processed.
  3. If selected for the festival, we can only accept hi-res downloads and by mail including blu-ray and/DVD/digital files.

    We do not accept DCP or older formats such as digi beta.

Please note:

– Māoriland Film Festival will not pay customs duties, cash on delivery or any other charges incurred during shipping. If the postage is insufficient it will be returned to the sender.

– Do not send submissions in fibre-filled envelopes as the dust can damage discs and viewing equipment.

– Preview DVDs will not be returned unless specifically requested and a self-addressed envelope with New Zealand postage is provided, after the Festival.

– Participants will be notified by email of the selection results by January 31, 2020 (date approximate).

– If selected, artist/screening fees are issued to the Indigenous creative as indicated on the Submission Form, or to a recognised distribution company. Awards will be given to the Indigenous creative.

– If selected for the festival, exhibition copies must be sent in by February 18, 2020.

Manuwhiri at Māoriland Film Festival outside Tainui Marae Otaki

NGĀ POU O TE WHARE

Hou mai koe ki roto i te whare krero o Moriland. Ko tna thuhu ko te iwi, ko te pouthu ko te mana o te kupu, ko te poutuarongo ko te ira tangata. Kei waenga ko te poutokomanawa o te aroha noa. Ka mutu, ko ng pou koko ka titi iho ki te whenua ko nei:

We bid you entry into our house of stories. The ridgepole is the people, the front post is the authority of the word, the rear post is the essence of our humanity. Between them, we find the support pillar of love. The posts that anchor the corners to the land are these:

CELEBRATION

Moriland celebrates the rise of indigenous cinema. It invites filmmakers from around the world to share their compelling big screen stories with us, and with each other.

INSPIRATION

Moriland upholds the mana and inspiration of our storytellers. We are guided by our elders, and taught by our children. The festival assists our community to expand their perspectives and to connect with those from other cultures.

RESPECT

Moriland is rooted in the traditions and language of the hap and iwi of taki. It is our honour to extend manaakitanga to the many visitors to the festival.

INCLUSION

Moriland provides a portal to the indigenous world for ALL people. It assists social cohesion, a sense of pride, and the informed well- being of our community.

HISTORY OF THE MĀORILAND FILM FESTIVAL

zoom442x314z100000cw442
2014
The first Māoriland office!
The inaugural Māoriland Film Festival was held from March 26 -30, 2014 with 54 shorts, 9 feature films and kōrero with award-winning Māori filmmakers Taika Waititi and Dave Whitehead.
See the 2014 programme

2014

The first Māoriland office!

The inaugural Māoriland Film Festival was held from March 26 -30, 2014 with 54 shorts, 9 feature films and kōrero with award-winning Māori filmmakers Taika Waititi and Dave Whitehead.

See the 2014 programme

1920s

Australian company Federated Feature Films Ltd propose a New Zealand branch to produce feature films.  Mr Frank Moore visits on their behalf and suggests Ōtaki as a suitable place to establish a studio because of the town’s varied scenery and “potent actinic rays” (white light). The New Zealand Moving Picture Company (Māoriland Films) was established.

2013 Libby announces the first Māoriland Film Festival at imagineNATIVE in Toronto Canada, inviting filmmakers from across the world to Ōtaki the following March. 

2013

Libby announces the first Māoriland Film Festival at imagineNATIVE in Toronto Canada, inviting filmmakers from across the world to Ōtaki the following March. 
ms_4948

2015

In its second year, Māoriland focussed on building it’s audience. It was attended by 5,000 visitors including James Rolleston and Lawrence Makoare presenting the Māori language film, The Deadlands.

Highlights of the 2015 programme included Hautoa Ma! The Deadland’s, Sume; Sound of a Revolution and a spotlight on the films of Te Arawa.

See the 2015 programme

Onyeka Arapai and LIT Crew perform before BORN TO DANCE at MFF16
Onyeka Arapai and LIT Crew perform before BORN TO DANCE at MFF16
The NATIVE Slam I from L to R; Blackhorse Lowe, Sunna Nousuniemi, Mick Finn, Mike Jonathan, Himiona Grace, Sonia Boileau, Echota Killsnight, Sara Margrethe Oskal, Zoe Hopkins, Kath Akuhata Brown, Tainui Stephens, Chelsea Winstanley, Trevor Mack, Pauline Clague and Libby Hakaraia.
The NATIVE Slam I from L to R; Blackhorse Lowe, Sunna Nousuniemi, Mick Finn, Mike Jonathan, Himiona Grace, Sonia Boileau, Echota Killsnight, Sara Margrethe Oskal, Zoe Hopkins, Kath Akuhata Brown, Tainui Stephens, Chelsea Winstanley, Trevor Mack, Pauline Clague and Libby Hakaraia.
MARCH 2017 Two weeks before the 2017 festival, MCT moves in to the Māoriland Hub - the largest building in Ōtaki's Main Street.

MARCH 2017

Two weeks before the 2017 festival, MCT moves in to the Māoriland Hub – the largest building in Ōtaki’s Main Street.
IMG_4134
17311238_1369970683023373_1010625982246263452_o

2016

In 2016 the festival grew once more with 62 events including 18 feature films and 70 short films.

Highlights of the 2016 programme included Lee Tamahori’s (Ngāti Porou) MAHANA, free whānau screenings of BORN TO DANCE (dir. Tammy Davis, Ngāti Rangi, Atihaunui a Paparangi)  and THREE WISE COUSINS (dir. Stallone Vaiaoga-Ioasa, Samoa) and award-winning North American features, LE DEP (dir. Sonia Boileau, Mohawk), MEKKO (dir. Sterlin Harjo, Seminole, Muscogee), CHASING THE LIGHT (dir. Blackhorse Lowe, Navajo) and FIRESONG (dir. Adam Garnet Jones, Cree, Métis)

2016 also saw the introduction of the NATIVE Slam – an international Indigenous collaboration challenge. Each year, in the days leading up to Māoriland Film Festival, Indigenous filmmakers team up in New Zealand to make a short film. A NATIVE Slam team is made up of one Māori filmmaker host and two international Indigenous filmmakers.

They have 72 hours and no budget. Since its inception in 2016 fifty one international Indigenous filmmakers have participated in the programme with seventeen short films created that have played in film festivals around the world.

Māoriland Hub at MFF 2017
Māoriland Hub at MFF 2017

MFF 2017

2017 PROGRAMME QUICK FACTS

      • 121 Features, Shorts, Documentaries, Workshops, Kōrero and other special events over five days.
      • 8 New Zealand premieres of multi-award-winning international Indigenous feature films.
      • 100 films from 15 countries and 71 Indigenous nations
      • 35 New Zealand films
      • A majority of film and videos created by Indigenous female directors (60%)
      • 9,500 visitors in attendance

In 2017 the festival awarded its first set of People’s Choice Awards. Audiences were asked to vote for their favourite films using an Emotiki voting system. The 2017 award winners were:

People’s Choice Award for Best Documentary: RISE; Standing Rock (dir. Michelle Latimer, Algonquin)

People’s Choice Award for Best Feature Film: TANNA (cultural dir. Jimmy Joseph Nako (Yakel Tribe), dir. Martin Butler, Bentley Dean)

People’s Choice Award for Short Film: BLACKBIRD (dir. Amie Batalibasi, Solomon Islander)

View the 2017 Programme

Michelle Latimer, director of RISE speaking at its sold-out Māoriland screening
Michelle Latimer, director of RISE speaking at its sold-out Māoriland screening

2018

The fifth annual Māoriland Film Festival was held from March 21 – 25, 2018. 

MĀORILAND FILM FESTIVAL KEY FACTS & FIGURES:

  • 58 Events to be held over five days.
  • 15 feature films and 86 short films with filmmakers from 11 countries and 65 Indigenous nations – 102 films in total.
  • 40 New Zealand films
  • 10 New Zealand premieres of international films
  • 12,500 visitors
  •  
Manuwhiri at Māoriland Film Festival outside Tainui Marae Otaki

Rawiri Paratene presenting the 2018 Māoriland Film Festival Keynote
Rawiri Paratene presenting the 2018 Māoriland Film Festival Keynote
NATIVE Minds - a series of interactive panel discussions is introduced to the programme
NATIVE Minds – a series of interactive panel discussions is introduced to the programme
Na'alehu Anthony - director of Moanauiākea speaks at the Māoriland Hub
Na’alehu Anthony – director of Moanauiākea speaks at the Māoriland Hub
Ngā Pakiaka - Māoriland's rangatahi leadership roopu at the Māoriland Red Carpet Party
Ngā Pakiaka – Māoriland’s rangatahi leadership roopu at the Māoriland Red Carpet Party
Female filmmakers from across Te Moananui a Kiwa at MFF2019
Female filmmakers from across Te Moananui a Kiwa at MFF2019

2019

The sixth annual Māoriland Film Festival was held from March 20 – 24, 2019.

MFF hosts the NZ premiere of VAI to an audience of 850. Over 70% of the 2019 programme are film premieres (Southern or NZ) and feature a celebration of the Pacific and is attended by over 12,500 visitors. Toi Matarau, the Māori visual arts programme is launched along with the plans for NZ’s first filmmakers residency at Māoriland (to be opened at end of 2019).

MĀORILAND FILM FESTIVAL KEY FACTS & FIGURES:

  • 62 Events held over five days.
  • 21 feature films and 117 short films with filmmakers from 19 countries and 94 Indigenous nations – 138 films in total.
  • 37 New Zealand films
  • 18 New Zealand premieres of international films including 8 Southern Hemisphere premieres.
  • 50% of programmed filmmakers identify as women. 
  • MFF2019 was attended by 12,000 visitors.

MFF2020

The 2020 festival will take place from March 18 -22 2020. It will be guided by the theme – Reretau – Everything in Harmony

mff2020_nighty4-copy