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TĀRIA TAKU MOKO MĀORI
KI NGĀ KIRIATA O TE WĀ

EMBED MY NATIVE SOUL IN FILM

Māoriland presents, facilitates and supports Māori and international Indigenous filmmakers and creatives.

We exist for the social, economic and educational success of our community in Ōtaki through connection to the wider world of Indigenous creativity and innovation.

MATCH Horizontal Orange
Outline Logo
MRFF LOGO WHITE-01
Gold
Toi Matarau Mix Horizontal Bebas Pattern

TĀRIA TAKU MOKO MĀORI
KI NGĀ KIRIATA O TE WĀ

EMBED MY NATIVE SOUL IN FILM

Māoriland presents, facilitates and supports Māori and international Indigenous filmmakers and creatives.

We exist for the social, economic and educational success of our community in Ōtaki through connection to the wider world of Indigenous creativity and innovation.

MATCH Horizontal Orange
Outline Logo
MRFF LOGO WHITE-01
Gold
Toi Matarau Mix Horizontal Bebas Pattern
Maoriland Film Festival 2021 poster - image shows a illustrated sunset over Kapiti Island with the Maoriland logo and dates of the festival overlaid - Ōtaki 24 - 28 March 2021

Māoriland Film Festival

Māoriland Film Festival is New Zealand’s premier international Indigenous Film Festival. Now into its eighth year, it is a cultural and arts event that invites New Zealanders to the Indigenous world through screen storytelling. 

Each March the Indigenous world comes together in Ōtaki, Aotearoa (New Zealand) to celebrate Indigenous screen storytelling at Māoriland Film Festival, the largest Indigenous film festival in the Southern Hemisphere.

Located on New Zealand’s Kāpiti Coast, Ōtaki is a vibrant seaside town where Māori culture and language thrives. Māoriland is celebrated for its manaakitanga and community spirit.

It is a place where creatives come to heal.

VOTE FOR THE
E TŪ WHĀNAU
RANGATAHI FILM AWARDS
PEOPLE’S CHOICE

Image shows the entrance to the Māoriland Hub. On each side of the door is gold text - house of the imagination, house of the indigenous, house of stories - he whare tapere, he whare taketake, he whare korero. Inside the doors you can see into an art gallery with Maori artworks on display

Upcoming Events

Māoriland Hub

The Māoriland Hub is a centre of excellence for Māori Film and Creative Arts. It is a home for the Indigenous, a home for the arts, a home for ideas and conversations – he whare taketake, he whare tapere, he whare kōrero. 

Open year-round in Ōtaki’s Main Street, The Māoriland Hub showcases Indigenous creativity and innovation through film, visual, music and performing arts, technology, kōrero and more. 

Here you will find Toi Matarau Art Gallery, M.A.T.C.H – the Māoriland Tech Creative Hub, Toi Matarau Art Gallery and the Māoriland Filmmaker Residency. (A first for New Zealand; the Māoriland Filmmaker Residency hosts national and international Indigenous artists.)  

Māoriland is supported by four pou – celebration, inspiration, respect and inclusion. It exists for the social, economic and educational success of its community in Ōtaki through connection to the wider world of Indigenous creativity and innovation.

Toi Matarau

Weavers Pip Devonshire and Sonia Snow sit at their work

Experience Toi Māori from traditional and contemporary artists both emerging and established.  

Toi Matarau at the Māoriland Hub is a home for Māori and Indigenous artists to connect within a diverse community of like minded creatives.  Where visual storytelling continues to support and enrich social and economic well-being.

Image shows inside Toi Matarau Gallery - there are a number of woven pieces on display as well as a carved pou.
Image shows a group of teenagers standing on a sand dune with a blue sky behind them. The teenagers are members of Nga Pakiaka, they are smiling.

Te Uru Maire

The Māoriland Rangatahi Strategy

“Te Uru Maire” unites film, creativity, innovation and technology to develop rangatahi for the future of work as story leaders, creatives and entrepreneurs.

By enabling rangatahi (youth) to have access to the tools and skills to create their own stories the MCT is empowering rangatahi Māori to have tino rangatiratanga over their own voice and be part of the collective Indigenous narrative worldwide.

Te Uru Maire is connected to industry with tangible pathways into high value creative work. In this way rangatahi Maori can contribute to the wellbeing of their whānau and wider community with an underlying commitment to tackling social and environmental issues for the benefit of the planet.

Māoriland Tech Creative Hub

Kia mataara e te iwi. Tukua mai te rangi hou kia eke panuku, kia eke tangaroa: Haumi e, hui e TAIKI E!

We’re supporting rangatahi in Ōtaki and the Horowhenua-Kāpiti Coast to become the creative tech leaders of the future.

Image shows MATCH logo - the logo is inspired by a spark or flame.
Image shows Nga Pakiaka Logo - within the logo are some roots - this is the meaning of Nga Pakiaka

Ngā Pakiaka

Ngā Pakiaka is a collective of rangatahi filmmakers aged 14 – 24 from across Aotearoa. 

We programme and present the Māoriland Rangatahi Film festival as well as present and do the Q & A’s for the Māoriland Film festival.

We facilitate rangatahi filmmaking workshops across NZ (16 workshops in 2020/21) and we make films and documentaries that get into festivals around the world.

E Tū Whānau Rangatahi Film Challenge

The E Tū Whānau Rangatahi Film Challenge is an opportunity for rangatahi up to the age of 24 to create films that present their perspective as young people in Aotearoa.

It’s about empowering rangatahi to tell their own stories through film.

Image shows E Tu Whanau Logo

Māoriland Productions

Developing the work of Indigenous filmmakers in Aotearoa and across the Indigenous world. 

A Samoan couple slow dance in the background of a family sitting room. In the foreground other family members are reading.
A group of filmmakers stand in front of a screen with the NATIVE Slam 3 logo behind them. In the centre a filmmaker holds a giant wooden pipi.